Evan Sabourin: Three Day Vigil

Installation by Evan Sabourin
April 5 – 7
Opening: April 5, 7pm

Gallery hours:
April 6, 12-5
April 7, 12-5

An experiment in collective grieving
THREE DAY VIGIL is an installation based on the accumulation of memory and loss where the end result is that of reconciliation.
taking the shrine from the ‘church’ setting and placing it into a secular environment such as (negative space) affords an ‘alternative’ community a venue for observing and paying its final respects, while the shrine itself remains faceless the intention is to promote reflection and the observance of loss.

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A vigil (from the Latin vigilia, meaning wakefulness) is a period of purposeful sleeplessness, an occasion for devotional watching, or an observance. The Italian word vigilia has become generalized in this sense and means “eve” (as in on the eve of the war).

A shrine (Latin: scrinium “case or chest for books or papers”; Old French: escrin “box or case”)[1] is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint, daemon or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated.[2] A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world’s religions, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Wicca, Chinese folk religion and Shinto, as well as in secular and non-religious settings such as a war memorial.[3] Shrines can be found in various settings, such as churches, temples, cemeteries, or in the home, although portable shrines are also found in some cultures.[4]

An altar is any structure upon which offerings such as sacrifices are made for religious purposes. Altars are usually found at shrines, and they can be located in temples, churches and other places of worship. Today they are used particularly in Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Shinto, Taoism, as well as in Neopaganism and Ceremonial Magic. Judaism did so until the destruction of the Second Temple. Many historical faiths also made use of them, including Greek and Norse religion

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